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Katherine WOOD

Katherine Wood – “My art is not about reproducing reality; but capturing the energy that creates it.”

The artwork of artist, Katherine Wood, can best be described as ‘abstract imagining’s which stride the divide between traditional landscape and contemporary abstraction.

Katherine’s canvases are a battleground of manipulated and scraped textures that reflect a powerful energy with paint. The landscapes are abstracts of her imagination that are representative of no specific time frame, place or reality but rather a general energy or spirit of place and time. This allows ones own imagination and interpretation to come into play.

Katherine was born in Johannesburg, South Africa in 1975 and studied Fine Art at Stellenbosch University. She spent a year in Melbourne and a year Edinburgh in 1999 and 2000 where she studied various local painting techniques. She currently resides on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, where she paints professionally. She has had numerous exhibitions within South Africa, international exhibitions in New York, Brisbane and Dubai and has had two artworks which were selected to be exhibited at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Her artwork forms part of private and corporate collections worldwide.

THE STORY BEHIND KATHERINE’S SIGNATURE TREE
A signature of Katherine’s landscapes (excluding the seascapes) is her little tree(s) that accompany the horizon of her artwork. Generally there is just the one tree but never more than 3 in any one artwork. The Boscia albitrunca or "Tree of Life" as it is called, is found in southern and central African regions, prefers open areas and usually stands alone. It is The tree firstly, gives Katherine’s landscapes a focal point and gives the artwork depth. Secondly, it is associated to an Original Katherine Wood and makes her work unique. This tree is so important that the local South African Tswana people do not even want to chop its wood, as they believe that if they burn it, their cows will only produce male calves.